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Bill's David Cross Interview -- FINAL

This is where writer Bill Murphy posts his interviews with the Crims, and other prog luminaries. It's a book in serial form -- that you become part of!

Moderator: LTinAspic

Bill's David Cross Interview -- FINAL

Postby LTinAspic on Wed Nov 08, 2006 3:43 pm

This installment of my November 23, 1993, interview with David Cross picks up where Part Two left off and concludes my time with David.

It was a pleasure to chat with David Cross. He was witty, friendly, and self-deprecating. And very passionate.

Enjoy!



BM: [laughs] Well, how did it come to be that you put that mellotron track on that mellotron sampler album (The Rime of the Ancient Sampler, 1993)?

DC: Oh, you know about all that, too?

BM: Oh yeah, I know Rob Ayling and all these guys.

DC: Oh right. Um, god, I can’t remember. I have a memory like a fish.

BM: [laughs]

DC: Um, how did that happen? I think he just, did he just ring me up? I think he just rang me up. I can’t remember. The guy who produced it, whose name also just rushed out of my mind. Do you remember who produced it?

BM: Um, not right off hand. Martin Smith, was it?

DC: Martin Smith.

BM: Yeah, yeah.

DC: Yes, Martin rang me up, that was it. Have you spoken to him ever?

BM: Not yet, no.

DC: You’ll have trouble understanding him, perhaps. He has a Burnmean accent.

BM: Rob Ayling has a bit of an accent, too.

DC: Uh-huh.

BM: But yeah.

DC: Um, so I think he just rang me up...This all seemed like a good idea to me, so I got involved in it. What was quite good about, that I enjoyed about it mostly, was that we actually didn’t--the track I did and the track that the keyboard player in my group, Shelia, did--we both did it on actual mellotrons. We didn’t use samples, which a lot of people did on the album. So we actually did a lot of running around and holding notes down.

BM: Yep.

DC: And you know, while the next one played. And just trying to give the illusion of long, sustained effects and things. And we actually played around with it much more, I think, in the studio. I think we managed to get ahold of a couple of effects that wouldn’t be possible with the samples. So that was very enjoyable, good fun. And yeah, I look forward to it, I’d like to do another one.

BM: Yeah, I found that your track was one of the better ones on there.

DC: Which one?

BM: Yours.

DC: Oh really?

BM: Yeah.

DC: Oh good.

BM: Yeah, a lot of the tracks didn’t sound quite right. There was something not mellotron-like about them.

DC: Yeah, I wouldn’t know what, I’m trying to think yesterday, what would I do for another one?

BM: [laughs]

DC: What the hell else can you do with a mellotron? Mostly, you’d just be fighting to keep them in tune.

BM: [laughs] Yeah.

DC: I don’t know. That’s the biggest nightmare.

BM: Yeah. Tell me about that a second. I’ve asked, in fact, I just talked to Boz Burrell the other day, and he said he hated the mellotron. “It was a pig of an instrument,”,he called it. What was your impression of the mellotron?

DC: I did too. I mean, at the end, all I wanted to do was push it off the stage somewhere.

BM: [laughs]

DC: And the trouble is, you get people like Martin Smith, who loves the mellotron, you know, and who’s almost indecent in affection to the instrument.

BM: [laughs]

DC: You really hate the thing, and somebody asks you to do this album track. “Aren’t they wonderful? Aren’t they terriffic sounds?” But yeah, from doing this track, I actually liked them more than I did at the time. I mean, at the time, it was supposed to be state-of-the-art technology, and they were shit, basically.

BM: [laughs]

DC: It was. I had no respect for them at all. I mean, now you look back at them as rather quaint, old-fashoned instruments, and from this distance, yes, they’re very nice.

BM: [laughs]

DC: But as something to rely upon downstage, in front of 18,000 people...[laughs] You’d be shitting yourself. You know, you’re out of tune in the middle of a track.

BM: [laughs] Yeah.

DC: That was a lot of fun. So I could have lived without them at the time.

BM: That’s --

DC: That said, I mean, there were great things we could do with them. By jamming them in between a couple of sounds, I mean, I used to love doing that. And winding them up and down, and making them go out of tune, I mean, that was all great.

BM: [laughs] They’re good for sound effects, basically.

DC: Yeah, that’s right.

BM: Certainly a distinctive sound. You know when you’re hearing a mellotron.

DC: They seem to be, yeah.

BM: Yeah.

DC: Funny, isn’t it?

BM: It’s making a comeback, from what I hear. People are using it more and more.

DC: Yeah, that’s true. People are looking for good analog sounds now, and the mellotron’s on the front line there. God help the roadies that have to cart them around.

BM: [laughs] I spoke with Leslie Bradley about that thing, and he had some great stories to tell about how that came to be. And he’s a colorful character, also.

DC: Yes. He was terrific, it was really nice to meet him on the album. I think they got to play on the original [Beatles song] "Strawberry Fields" mellotron. I think she--I wasn’t able to go to that sort of record launch or reception here in Birking. But she went to it, and I think they had the "Strawberry Fields" tapes and the "Strawberry Fields" album mellotron there. And I think that sort of thing’s interesting. As, you know, recorded sounds.

BM: Which of those three albums that you worked on with Crimson do you look back on, I guess, with most enjoyment or fondness or...

DC: Well, I actually do. I like everything live. Live, I remember with a lot of affection, I think. So, you know, we did a lot of live recording, and some of that was on Starless, and some of that was on Red, and you know, some of it was on subsequent stuff, like the The Great Deciever [box set].

BM: Oh yeah.

DC: And I do remember that sort of wonderful, dangerous feeling...[laughs]

BM: Mmm, yeah.

DC: ...Of not knowing what the hell you were going to play or anybody else was going to play.

BM: [laughs]

DC: And that’s tremendously exciting. And it’s very hard to, I think to have the confidence to be able to do that.

BM: Oh yeah, yeah.

DC: And I think we were very lucky to get away with doing that, really. And to, you know, find ourselves in an environment in which we could create music that way. So that, I’m very kind of inspired by, I think. I do find that very inspiring, because I think the attitude with which you should create all music is one of improvisation. Everything should be fresh sounding. That’s the way an actor approaches thier work. You know, an actor has to have, you know, feelings runnung around somewhere. No matter how controlled they are, they have to be running around in order for his work to have any life. And I think the same way, you have to have that sense of creating something for the first time in order for it to have life for the audience. So improvisation is a type of core lesson. It has something to do with all our work, whether you do it in front of people or not. I think it should still form a part of every musician’s creative process. You know, I think it sort of throws light on the whole business of making music. But I suppose it’s a fun, I mean, I do remember Jamie [Muir] in the studio, you know, the things I mentioned earlier, making clay and you know, his drum kit made of bits of old kitchen.

BM: [laughs]

DC: Tin pots and things. I think those things are wonderful. I look back on those wonderful surprises, really. Um, my own recording was terribly difficult, you know. I wasn’t a very good player, I’m not very good player now. It takes me, you know, a long time to get things right. Or I might get them right straight away. So I know, really, within almost straight away with any recording I do, you know, that it’s either there, or it’s going to be a really painful process. [laughs]

BM: [laughs]

DC: You know, either I’m relaxed and I get it right, or it’s something that’s too hard for me, you know, and I’ll be there all bloody night. But each note’s, you know, one at a time. And that’s always been with me I think. I mean, it’s true then, you know, I’ve got to study a lot more since then, and hopefully improved. But you know, there are still parts that I find very, very hard to play, and I spend a long, long time doing them. And, you know, that isn’t enjoyable, really. You know, the ones, the bits that come out fast are usually quite good fun. You know, you feel pleased with yourself, you feel confident. “Good grief, I am a musician after all.”

BM: [laughs]

DC: You come up to playing three notes in tune, and in time. And you’re there four hours later, still trying to do it. And you’re thinking, “Oh dear, why the hell did I ever choose this instrument?”

BM: Yeah.

DC: You know, “Why didn’t I just play the piano or something?”

BM: Well, is there any track --

DC: So I have mixed feelings about recordings, really.

BM: You know, I was going to ask you, of the recordings you did have here, is there any that you can point to and say, “That’s my favorite one. I was just killer on that track.”

DC: Uh, with Crimson stuff, I don’t, I haven’t listened to a lot of the stuff, I haven’t listened to the The Great Deceiver? I don’t even know waht’s there. But out of the albums I listened to at the time, I always traditionally liked "Trio" [Track 5 on Starless and Bible Black]. Not so much really because of my playing, just because of the group feeling that came from it, and the whole, the fact that the fourth part, Bill's [Bruford] part of not playing, was a real contribution.

BM: [laughs]

DC: And that was very true and very real, and it was a wonderful moment in our kind of personal lives, I think. You know, whether anybody else can remember why that is now, I don’t know. But it was late, and we were tired, and it had been a long tour. We’d been to America, I think, then to Europe. I know we were all very tired and fed up, and you know, suddenly we played this terribly simple, silly little thing, and it’s just, it’s simplicity was suddenly very moving somehow.

BM: Well, that's something I was going to mention. There are certain parts of your playing that I find very emotional. They seem like you did put a lot of emotion into some of these parts, and "Trio" could have been one of them. That seems to stand out in my mind, yeah.

DC: Well, there was. I don’t think I really succeeded, and I think I’ve learned since then much more how to turn the emotion into sound.

BM: Uh-huh.

DC: I think what, I mean the way that I came into music, I came with from a background of music and drama. I’d studied music and acting, both. And it’s kind of the things we were talking about just now. There’s always been a very real connection to me between the two things. And at that stage, I was very concerned with actually feeling and feeling things while I was playing, basically. And very concerned that that was always the way I felt. In other words, everything meant something. You know, part of my concern with that meant that my techinque was fairly poor, I mean I wasn’t giving that enough attention, really. And also the circumstances in which I was playing made it very hard to actually improve my technique. So I had to do a lot of work on that afterwardsd. But now I’ve learnt, I think, to be able to turn that emotion to sound much more easily than I could then. So what I’m saying, I suppose, is I think I used to hang around a lot, feeling a lot, but not playing very much. [laughs]

BM: [laughs] You’re just standing there, emoting, huh?

DC: That’s right. Emoting heavily and contributing absolutely nothing.

BM: [laughs]

DC: But I think I’ve improved my coverage of the ground a bit since then.

BM: What would you say King Crimson is going to be most remembered for? Is it gonna be just improvisation, or adventure, or strange time signatures? What is King Crimson’s claim to fame, here?

DC: Hmm, I don’t know really. I’m too outside the game. Or too inside it and outside of it. I mean, I’m outside the mainstream appreciation society, so I don’t know.

BM: Yeah.

DC: So I don’t know how it fits in. I suppose in most people’s minds, it has no claim to fame whatsoever, does it?

BM: [laughs]

DC: The impression I get from most people, is they think it was something--most people are very interested, have some kind of respect for King Crimson. And I think it was something important, or they think somebody else thought it was important.

BM: [laughs]

DC: Or something like that. Which I’ve never really understood at all, because, you know, we didn’t sell enough records for it to have meant enough to that many people.

BM: Yeah. Well something must be going on with it, because these box sets are endless. You know, Fripp with Frame By Frame and The Great Deceiver, and the one after that and the one after that, and...

DC: Yeah, it’s all the same material, though.

BM: [laughs]

DC: Just different packaging.

BM: Who do you suppose is buying this, then?

DC: I don’t know. I don’t know. Some people seem to have bought it in Japan. I don’t know why.

BM: [laughs]

DC: It’s all very odd. I really don’t understand it at all. Yeah, I don’t know, I don’t understand it. Completely beyond me. Baffeles me.

BM: [laughs] Well, if you asked--if Fripp called you up today, and said, “Would you do this again? We’re going to get the band line-up from 1973 together again.” Would you do that again with him?

DC: Hmm. Would I? I would think about it, I think. Well, the same band, John Wetton and Bill?

BM: Yep. Even Jamie. Pull him away from painting for a while.

DC: Yeah. Oh, I think it would be wonderful to do that, yeah. I’m not sure that I would. I think if we did it--not that it would ever happen--but if we did it, it would have to be in the spirit of doing something new. I think there would be no mileage to be gained by playing old tunes.

BM: Yeah.

DC: You know, I’d hate to play the ending to "Larks’ Tongues" badly yet again. [laughs]

BM: [laughs] Once was enough, huh?

DC: Yeah, play something I could do well.

BM: [laughs]

DC: If it was something new, I think I would love to do it. You know, that’s a first reaction. I think, you know, it probably would be impossible. You know, middle-aged men sitting around looking at each other.

BM: [laughs]

DC: I think it would be probably pretty miserable.

BM: [laughs]

DC: We’re all tending our private needs now, you know? We’ve got to have things done certain ways.

BM: Yeah.

DC: We’d probably have to have our own cars for each, and there’s not enough money for it. You know, I don’t know who’s smoking and who’s not, these days. It could get very complicated. So, I think as a practical thing, it probably wouldn’t work out, and I’m not sure that’s something I’d want to do for very long. But I certainly, I think I’d love to do it for a short period, yeah.

BM: Did you --

DC: I think it would be very interesting to do it with people again. It would be very interesting, all the different points of view now.

BM: Yeah.

DC: I mean, I know what Fripp’s doing now, but it would be very interesting to see where John’s got to, and Bill has. Just what kind of common language there might be.

BM: Supposedly, I don’t know if you’ve heard or not, but Fripp’s trying to put the band together, a new version of Crimson together next year.

DC: David Sylvan, is that the--

BM: Uh, I hadn’t heard that. No, I’d heard--

DC: Or Adrian Belew?

BM: Yeah, Adrian, Tony Levin, Jerry Marotta on drums. [Hey, that was the rumor in the beginning. Robert eventually chose Bill Bruford...and the rest is history.]

DC: Yes.

BM: Have you heard that, kind of?

DC: Yeah, I’ve heard that, yeah. Sounds good.

BM: Yeah.

DC: I haven’t really heard that much, but the bits I’ve heard sound very impressive.

BM: Really.

DC: I heard some stuff down at Tony Arnold’s place where we recorded the Big Picture album. Have you got that?

BM: No, I haven’t.

DC: You haven’t? Have you got any of my stuff?

BM: No I don’t. I was going to ask you that, if there’s anything avalable on tape or CD or...

DC: Yeah, CDs. Probably the best thing is to get it from the record company.

BM: Who puts that out?

DC: It’s a mega company called Red Hot Records.

BM: Red Hot Records. Ok.

DC: Yeah, it got a great review.

BM: Tony Arnold did the recording for it?

DC: Yeah, he did the recording on the last one, the Big Pictcure. That’s probably the one you ought to listen to, that’s the last one. The new one we’re working on is called Testing to Destruction.

BM: Ok.

DC: Shall I read you this review? It’s really good.

BM: Oh yeah, definately.

DC: “David Cross, The Big Picture, Red Hot, CD.” This is by, this is in I/E Magazine. Do you know that?

BM: Uh huh, yeah. It’s an American prog rock newsletter type thing.

DC: Right. Darren Bergstein wrote this one. “This one’s got Crimson written all over it, ember-red and burning. So let’s expose the facts. Cross doesn’t wax sentimental and just revive the old Crimson magic. The Big Picture merely validates what his followers have known for years and his detractors claim doesn’t exist, for this guy’s one hell of a musician, and a crackerjack composer, to boot. The Big Picture rocks, reels, cajoles and swells. Instruments crash and burn, intertwine and convulse, live and die. Cross has found hte missing link between the reticent decadence of pop and the ferocious vitality of progressive rock. With his hyperactive band behind him--that’s certainly true--the guest violinist pushes the edge of the enevelope with arrangements, stunning prowess and sprawling momentum. John Dillon’s vocals, the one new ingredient added to the witches’ brew, but his venomous delivery fits in beautifully with the band’s frenzied trek across such an incinerated sonic landscape. Cross’ viloin, both acousic and moody, has never been so potent and penetrating a force, jumping effortlessly from moody, introspective passages ("Sundays)" to apocalyptic cries brought painfully to life ("Black Eyes"). But TThe Big Picture is a group recording for sure. Percussionist Dan Mire--that’s the American--turns in a bravuea performance full of fanfare, stomp, and circumstance. He compliments Cross beautifuly, aided no doubt, by the joint tenure they shared in the underrated, "Lowflying Aircraft." Sheila Maloney’s keyboards threaten to split open the universe in a morass of bleating bursts, strange cattle calls, and intimate insurges of paralectic electronics. And Dillon? Is it just imagination, or does his voice smack of a droll, conspiritorial wit? His presences on The Big Picture bespeaks of a derranged, bastard cousin to Wetton, slightly off-kilter, prone, and menacing. This recording indeed finds Cross finally coming into his own. No, strike that. He’s always been there, but this time, he’s confirmed it in a blaze of glory. Red Hot Records, 29 Beethoven Street, London, W104LG England.”

BM: Wow.

DC: Great review, eh?

BM: Oh, defintely, yeah.

DC: That’s the best one I’ve got.

BM: Yeah, I’ve spoken to Darren before.

DC: Oh yeah?

BM: Yeah. That’s interesting. Yeah, I’m definatley going to have to get that. Definately. How many CD’s do you have out? Is that the--

DC: We’ve got two. The first one was an instrumental one called Memos From Purgatory, and this is the second one called The Big Picture. We’re just tyring to get the money together for the next one.

BM: Yeah.

DC: It’s on Pony Canyon in Japan. Red Hot Records in England. And we can’t get anywhere in America interested.

BM: Not even--how about if you went through like Voiceprint or something?

DC: I can’t remember if we tried them or not. They’re very low sales, aren’t they.

BM: Yeah, although Rob’s worked out a distribution deal with Sunshine Records, Sunshine Distribution here in the states that’s a very large distributor. So his Voiceprint things are getting distributed.

DC: I don’t think we tried him, I’m not sure with this one. I think we did with the previous one maybe.

BM: You may want to give him a ring. I think he’d love to do it.

DC: Hmm, if we could get some distribution, it would certainly be worth it.

BM: Yeah, and this deal he’s got with the States is very advanced. It’s, he’s getting some good notice with that and his records are getting out there.

DC: Good. So anyway, things, you know, musicallly are going very well. But it’s just very frustrating finding brick walls in the business. That’s up against us all around.

BM: Do you, let me as you something about the state of progressive rock at the moment. There’s a lot of progressive rock bands, espeically in England today. Galahad, IQ, Pendragon, and all these kinds of things. Is that progressive rock to you, when you hear that stuff?

DC: I don’t know. I’m sorry.

BM: Yeah, ok.

DC: I’m terribly ignorant. I always have been.

BM: [laughs]

DC: I don’t know anything that’s going on.

BM: Well, there’s not many people that do know of them yet, they’re still kind of trying to get deals and whatnot. Galahad’s beeing recorded by Tony Arnold right now, and I’ve spoeken with Tony quite a few times. He’s a nice guy. Alright, so that’s not an important question anyway.

DC: I’m terribly bad. Everybody else in my group is very good. They know what’s going on.

BM: [laughs]

DC: I never know anything. I’m terrribly sorry.

BM: No, it’s ok.

DC: I know a little bit about theatre and I quite like dance. I’m doing a course, I’m studying for an MA in performing arts.

BM: Are you really?

DC: Yeah, I’m doing a part-time course one afternoon a week, at the moment. It’s terrific. I started that in September. It’s you know, a real breath of fresh air. It’s wonderful talking to peoploe from different areas who are very interested in the same kind of questions that I am, you know. And there are lots of things I thought were wrong with me, I didn’t reallize what was wrong with the world.

BM: [laughs]

DC: So I just realized that. [laughs] And you know, In thought I was having trouble with metanarritives, like you know, religion and science and things, but I didn’t realize everybody was having trouble.

BM: Oh yeah. Everybody struggles with them from time to ttime.

DC: Yeah. So it’s really, it’s kind of like therapy, this coures. I’m really feeling quite excited by it.

BM: What is your undergraduate degree in?

DC: Music and drama.

BM: Oh, ok, yeah.

DC: Though the way it was set up in this country, I did what was called a teacher’s training certificate, so it wasn’t actually a degree, but it’s accepted as such these days. But it wasn’t at the time. But yeah, I did music and drama. And I did soem acting as well, after Crimson. I did a bit of acting and you know, explored that area quite a lot, music and theatre together.

BM: So that’s between, let’s say, the period of Red and now, those are the kinds of things you’ve been doing?

DC: Yeah. I’m teaching a lot as well.

BM: Really?

DC: Yeah, I’ve done a lot of teaching. I used to work in music education, doing a lot with adults and you know, a whole range of people. I did a lot of work there. And then in this country we kind of ran out of money for things like that. So now I’m doing school teaching. Which is much harder work, much more difficult. And I don’t think I’m going to stay in it reallly, because it’s got nothing much to do with music.

BM: [laughs]

DC: It’s mostly to do with trying to keep children under control.

BM: [laughs]

DC: You know, “Shut up, and sit down.” You know, you have very little connection with music at all. And when I was working in community education, I was able to work in experimental education areas as well. I used to teach experimental music and theatre class. You know, dealing with video and stuff. And you know, it was a much richer kind of experience in which I was involved myself, you know, which I would play myself or direct. And it was with people who were very serious about what they were doing. But I don’t have those opportunities in schools. That’s partly why I’m doing this MA as well, and if I can’t have a living from music, I’d like to teach at a high level, perhaps. That’s the only sort of thing that would interest me, either being creatively involved in music, or music and theatre, or teaching at a level where the students themselves were seriously committed to what they were doing.

BM: Yeah, yeah.

DC: But I’m very interested in exploratory work, really. You know, exploring things, rather than, you know, rather than trying to reinvent the wheel, I suppose.

BM: What is your address there? Could I send you letters or whatnot?

DC: Yeah, of course. [Gives his address.] Yeah, please do, Bill. I’m very interested in what’s going on. If you give Red Hot Records a call, I’m sure they’ll send you whatever you want. Do you know about Low Flying Aircraft and all that stuff?

BM: No, I do not, as a matter of fact.

DC: Right, then. It’s an album that I did with Dan Maw, the drummer, and it's got -- do you know Keith Tippett?

BM: Oh yeah, definately.

DC: Yeah, he was on that as well.

BM: Is he--I’ve been trying to get ahold of him lately, I’ve been trying to get ahold of Keith lately. But he’s always out of the country or something.

DC: Yeah, he does a lot of work. That’s where his bread and butter comes from, work and touring, I think.

BM: Yeah.

DC: I haven’t talked to him lately. I don’t know where he is.

BM: Yeah, I call there from time to time, and I speak to who I assume is his wife, and she always says, “Well, he’s not here. He’ll be in next week.” Or something. But I can’t seem to catch him.

DC: Yeah, it’s Julie, Julie Tippett. She used to be Julie Driscol, who used to be very famous here as a singer. But I don’t know if she was ever in this country. Probably was.

BM: You’re working on your next album?

DC: Yeah, we’ve done some live recording, which I think will be the one after, in fact. And we’ve got material ready for the next one. We’ve got some money from a European record company called IQ, has put up some money. I’m waiting to hear from Pony Canyon in Japan to see if they’re going to put up some money for it. And as soon as we’ve got the money, we’ll go into the studio.

BM: Oh, that’s great.

DC: And record it. And worry about when the money comes in for the next one. [laughs]

BM: Yeah. You gonna use Tony for the recording?

DC: I don’t think so. Really, because he’s a long way out of London, it’s actually a really nice experience. It’s very, you know, he had a lot of very good input into the last one. But we’ve got, oh, I’ve forgotten his name. I’m hopeless, aren’t I?

BM: [laughs]

DC: I can’t remember the guy, he’s quite iterested in produceing the next one. He’s quite keen himself to produce the next one with us.

BM: Ok.

DC: But Brian will tell you. The man at Red Hot Records, Brian Leafe, he’ll tell you more about that. I’ve forgotten his name. [laughs]

BM: Ok. [laughs]

DC: I’m hopeless. Is that it?

BM: Yeah. Well, I really appreciate your time this evening.

DC: Yeah, you will when you get the bill.

BM: [laughs] I get to remember you twice, then. Now and a month from now.

DC: Yes.

BM: But it’s great to talk to you.

DC: Let me make sure I have your name right. So it’s Bill?

BM: Bill Murphy. M-u-r-p-h-y.

DC: Murphy. Yep.

BM: You’ve got it.

DC: And the phone number?

BM: My phone number is [long since disconnected or re-assigned, I'm sure].

DC: 70. That’s St. Louis.

BM: Yep!

DC: Ok, well lovely to talk to you.

BM: Oh, it’s a pleasure. It’s a pleasure to talk to you.

DC: Good luck iwth the book, I hope it all comes together well.

BM: Thanks, I appreciate it.

DC: I’d really love to see you in St. Louis.

BM: Are you going to be in St. Louis sometime?

DC: I’d love to, but nobody’s inviting us over at the moment.

BM: [laughs] I’ll be going over there, probably next spring or something, to meet--

DC: Oh, I’d love to see you.

BM: Pete Sinfield and all these guys, Mike Giles and everybody.

DC: Oh yeah.

BM: Yeah, if I get a chance, I’d love to stop by and say Hi.

DC: We should organize a King Crimson dinner, we’ll all go out.

BM: [laughs] Wouldn’t that be something?

DC: That would be great, yeah. I’m sure we could do that.

BM: [laughs] Yeah.

DC: All it takes is somebody to organize it.

BM: Yeah. I’ve actually been putting a lot of people in touch with each other. In fact, I put John Wetton in touch with Jamie Muir, and I put Ian McDonald in touch with Greg Lake. And Robert Fripp mentioned me to all of them. So I seem to be the person in the middle right now. I can tell you all what’s going on with who. Yeah, it’s possible.

DC: Well, I’ll tell you what I do want to know about.

BM: Mmhm?

DC: Do you know about what you might want to talk to Brian about? His King Crimson videos. Do you know about any?

BM: No. I haven’t heard anybody coming up with any. Do some exist?

DC: If you do come across any, could you let us know? Brian’s trying to see if he can get some, you know, video together if he can find enough old videos. Because he works also for Cali Communications, which is a video company.

BM: Oh yeah, they’re a big, they do a lot of CD re-releases and things.

DC: Yeah. That’s right. He works there for two days a week, sort of.

BM: Didn’t Robert ever make any films or videos of the band?

DC: I don’t know if he did. While I was with them, there was some stuff with Atlantic Records, and we did promos with Atlantic records which invovled recording a Central Park concert.

BM: Yeah.

DC: And there were a couple of TVs. We did Midnight Special and Brennan TV. Not very much, odd ones, and French, a couple of French TV things we did. So there ought to be some stuff around.

BM: Yeah.

DC: Not sure if you can trust that much, with a mind like mine.

BM: [laughs]

DC: But anyway, if you hear of any, let me know.

BM: Yeah, definately. I’ll keep in touch.

DC: Alright.

BM: Ok, thanks, David.

DC: All the best.

BM: Have a good evening. Cheers.

DC: Bye bye.

BM: Bye bye.


That concludes my interview with David. Next up? Greg Lake, Pete Sinfield, or Ian McDonald. Watch for it to appear here in the next couple of weeks.

Bill
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Postby Riverman on Wed Nov 08, 2006 3:53 pm

Great stuff! DC has always (relatively) been such a background figure, and I'd been wondering if this one was ever going to be finished. Wonderful.

I vote Ian McDonald next, but really, I'll be thrilled to read them all.
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Postby jtmack on Wed Nov 08, 2006 9:37 pm

DC wrote: Do you know about what you might want to talk to Brian about? His King Crimson videos. Do you know about any?


Could Brian be hoarding the holy grail of Crimson lore?
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Re: Bill's David Cross Interview -- FINAL

Postby evktalo on Wed Nov 08, 2006 9:49 pm

Whoa, great stuff again! Glad to have an another installment. I loved the bit about mellotron and also the stuff about improvisation..

LTinAspic wrote:DC: David Sylvan, is that the--


Ahh, what a band it could have been..

BM: Yeah, Adrian, Tony Levin, Jerry Marotta on drums. [Hey, that was the rumor in the beginning. Robert eventually chose Bill Bruford...and the rest is history.]


Well actually, coming up with Pat Mastelotto was more relevant to crimstory in my humble opinion. ;-)


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Postby vrooom on Wed Nov 08, 2006 11:10 pm

Well Marotta was there for Sylvian/Fripp album and then Mastelotto got the gig, despite Michael Giles auditioning for that tour. (Again, in an alternate universe, King Crimson recorded THRAK with Giles & Bruford on the skins with Giles continuing on with KC as we know it). Of course, Sylvian/Fripp was really King Crimson by any other name but no-one is supposed to know about that.


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Re: Bill's David Cross Interview -- FINAL

Postby Riverman on Thu Nov 09, 2006 2:34 pm

evktalo wrote:
BM: Yeah, Adrian, Tony Levin, Jerry Marotta on drums. [Hey, that was the rumor in the beginning. Robert eventually chose Bill Bruford...and the rest is history.]

Well actually, coming up with Pat Mastelotto was more relevant to crimstory in my humble opinion.

A while back I downloaded a solo Ade show from '93 or thereabouts, and at one point he tells the audience that the new Crim will be a five-piece with Jerry drumming. I guess at one point it was more than a rumor.

(But yes, I wholeheartedly agree about P@.)
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Postby LTinAspic on Thu Nov 09, 2006 10:45 pm

Riverman wrote:Great stuff! DC has always (relatively) been such a background figure, and I'd been wondering if this one was ever going to be finished. Wonderful.

I vote Ian McDonald next, but really, I'll be thrilled to read them all.


Ian had astounding things to say. I have dozens of interview tapes made with Ian. I interviewed him over the course of 2-3 years. I spent time with him in his home. He's a great guy.

I think I'd like to post my two-tape interview of Ian speaking track-by-track about the first Crimso album. I remember sitting in his apartment with the album playing and him talking into my tape recorder as each song and passage came up. It was eye-opening.

I'll get my wife to work on that one. :)

Thanks for all the comments guys! I appreciate them.

I think I have the last little bit of Jamie Muir to post, too. I'll get on that ASAP.

Cheers,

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Postby vrooom on Thu Nov 09, 2006 10:48 pm

It's all gold dust, mate. I'm just glad that this site has facilitated this material's wider exposure...


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Postby Gilesfan on Sat Nov 11, 2006 1:34 pm

We need more Bill! Come on man! :D


McDonald, Giles...any others you have in the can!


Thanks again!
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Postby LTinAspic on Mon Dec 18, 2006 7:16 pm

Gilesfan wrote:We need more Bill! Come on man! :D


McDonald, Giles...any others you have in the can!


Thanks again!



They're coming! Got lots in the can.

As I re-read Greg Lake, I remembered the great conversations I had with Pete Sinfield and Mike Giles. I think I'll work on those next.

Hang in there. Lots more to come!
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