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Bill Bruford

What's an alumni? Is that what silver foil is made of? No, you buffoon - this is where you post about ex-members of the band.

Bill Bruford

Postby L.RayRojo on Tue Mar 01, 2005 8:56 pm

There is a very good realplayer stream of Bruford and Borstlap from Bill's site here
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Postby Gilesfan on Thu Jul 19, 2007 8:33 am

Bill has been somewhat compared to Art Blakey in that he has taken jazz musicians and gave them a place to develop, learn and grow with Earthworks. Once said would like to end up like Max Roach. Seems he is indeed doing that.

He said in Modern Drummer Magazine in 1989 that he was basically through with all these "rock" bands, that for all intents and purposes he had "grown out of them". And also that back then he was getting called up all the time to be in these "reunions", but was not interested in them. So I am still surprised he did Anderson, Bruford, Wakeman Howe, the 1991 Yes Union tour and even post 1994 King Crimson for that matter! :o But of course, I am glad he did all these things. :D
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Postby vrooom on Thu Jul 19, 2007 10:32 am

He did the reunions because of the money and the big paycheck enabled him to fund his other music projects such as Earthworks. He has mentioned this in interviews. Wakeman has the same work ethos too.


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Postby MiKcrobe on Thu Aug 16, 2007 3:49 pm

Does anyone know where I can find Fripp's letter or memo or whatever to Bill Bruford, which outlined advice on when he should and shouldn't add something to the music? The one that led to the whole "admirable restraint" thingy. It contained concise imperatives like "If you feel the music needs something else, don't play it." et al. I searched Elephant Talk, but couldn't find anything. A Google search turned up nothing either. Perhaps it's in Sid's book; I'll have to look there. I'd be surprised if it's nowhere on the interwebs . . .
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Postby Riverman on Thu Aug 16, 2007 11:01 pm

There's at least part of the list shown among the clippings in the 30th-ann. Discipline booklet.

April 14th, World HQ. Bill is really getting to me, so I'm trying to understand how he works.

1. He's a very busy player, and doesn't enjoy playing sparsely;
2. His parts have lots of fills and major changes of texture;
3. His fills are dramatic; i.e., they shock.

So I've been drawing up suggestions:

1. Any existing solution to a problem is the wrong one: absoletum, obsoletum.
2. If you have an idea, don't play it.
3. When a change in the music needs emphasis, don't play it; the change in the music is emphasis enough.
4. Don't phrase with any other member of the band unless it's in the part.
5. Phrasing in the part should include no more than two people.
6. If the tension in the music needs emphasizing, don't. The tension is there because of what you're playing, not what you're about to play.
7. If you really have to change your part to build tension, don't add - leave out.
8. The maximum tension you can add is by stopping completely.
9. If there is space for a fill which is demanded by the music, don't play it: there are three other people who would like to use the opportunity.
10. If the part you're playing is boring, stop listening with your head.
11. If this still bores you, listen to the interaction between all the parts.
12. If this still bores you, stop playing and wait until you are no longer bored.
13. Do not be dramatic.
14. Do not be afraid to repeat yourself.
15. Do not be afraid to take your time.

Boy, what a negative list. Let's be positive about this.

1. Repeat yourself.
2. Take your time.
3. Leave room.
4. Listen to everyone else.
5. Develop a new set of cliches.
6. Develop a new vocabulary of drum sounds.
7. Listen to the sound of what you play.


End of page. Don't know if there's any more after that.
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Postby MiKcrobe on Fri Aug 17, 2007 1:27 pm

Riverman wrote:There's at least part of the list shown among the clippings in the 30th-ann. Discipline booklet.

<snip>

End of page. Don't know if there's any more after that.

That's it! Thanks.
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Re: Bill Bruford

Postby DrGonzo on Mon Sep 21, 2009 3:24 am

Bill is I think the best Crimson drummer, he was with the band for a long time. And the music he helped make was some of their best work. He shines in the 73-74 era. His slow stuff rules and his fast stuff blows my mind. I think him and Fripp play really well together, hes just the man.
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