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If you could take a private guitar lesson with Fripp...

Seen something about the guy that looks like a mushroom? Perhaps you just want to comment on his diaries? Post all that Fripperholic stuff here.

Postby MarkSullivan on Thu Nov 03, 2005 8:47 pm

jtmack wrote:And this is what stood out to me.
"...Be seeing you!"
Spooky really.
Lessons with Fripp no thank you. I like to be loose when making music. Fripp seems way to up tight for me. As he would put it bad vibes. But I really don't know if that's what he's really like.


Spooky, indeed.

I think you may be mis-interpreting Fripp's take on discipline. As I understand it, the point is to be focused, yet relaxed. You need to have sufficient technique so you can be open to the musical impulse. It's hard to be creative if you're constantly focused on the basic mechanics of playing your instrument. Charlie Parker expressed a similar notion when he said you had to study music, then "forget all that shit and just play." Maybe some of the Crafty types can correct me if I'm wrong.
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Postby drdennis on Thu Nov 03, 2005 8:51 pm

I fully agree with Mark.
In a Frippian taxonomy "relaxation" is necessary
tension, whereas "tension" is unecessary tension.
I think he and Parker, and other master musicians,
are quite relaxed and free in their playing, but highly
intentional and absorbed in the moment, as a result of
countless hours of paying their tab in learning and
development (e.g. practice!)
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Postby Gilesfan on Thu Nov 03, 2005 9:06 pm

vrooom wrote:For a minute then, I thought MalcX was still alive... Unhappy thoughts...


Sorry, sorry, sorry!


Geez! :shock: I did not even notice that when I posted! It spooked me just now when I opened the thread just now and saw his post. I thought the same thing. Wow.
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Postby jtmack on Thu Nov 03, 2005 9:25 pm

Thank you Dr Dennis and Mark.. I don’t have enough the technical skill at guitar for lessons with Fripp to do much good. I love to create music mostly vocal melodies that I play out by sing or making my son play them out. He plays trumpet sax key boards and of course guitar.It all about playing the sounds in my head, guitar is just a tool that I use to give me parameters and a key to open that door. I have to be loose to turn on that musical state, hell sometimes it's hard to turn it off. But it's harder getting there. Dr Dennis Fripp did teach a few bass players that when on to have great careers. So he must be a great teacher. Mark that's what I've always done. They are words of wisdom "forget all that shit and just play."
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Postby Owen on Thu Nov 03, 2005 9:37 pm

drdennis wrote:I think he and Parker, and other master musicians, are quite relaxed and free in their playing, but highly
intentional and absorbed in the moment, as a result of
countless hours of paying their tab in learning and
development (e.g. practice!)


I believe this is the argument behind the progressive lessening of use of the term "Free Improvisation" in favour of "Spontaneous Composition". The former implies an element of "making it up", whilst the latter empahsises the focus and control needed for successful playing in this area.

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Postby Riverman on Thu Nov 03, 2005 11:10 pm

drdennis wrote:In a Frippian taxonomy "relaxation" is necessary
tension, whereas "tension" is unecessary tension.
I think he and Parker, and other master musicians,
are quite relaxed and free in their playing, but highly
intentional and absorbed in the moment, as a result of
countless hours of paying their tab in learning and
development (e.g. practice!)

I've always gotten the same impression.. that RF is big on spontaneity (or at least the need to express something in the moment), but he feels all that rigorous training and discipline are required in preparation to be able to play whatever comes to mind at a given moment. Or something.
The sound of one hand clapping is the same as the sound of a tree falling when no one's around to hear it.
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Postby Gilesfan on Fri Nov 04, 2005 10:16 am

drdennis wrote:I fully agree with Mark.
In a Frippian taxonomy "relaxation" is necessary
tension, whereas "tension" is unecessary tension.
I think he and Parker, and other master musicians,
are quite relaxed and free in their playing, but highly
intentional and absorbed in the moment, as a result of
countless hours of paying their tab in learning and
development (e.g. practice!)


I agree totally.

Great improvisors and soloists like Fripp, Parker, Gillespie, Coltrane, Davis, Moraz, Holdsworth, Goodsall, Corea, Burton, McLaughlin, Hancock, Marsalis (both), Hubbard, Brown, Shorter, Rollins, Peterson, Clarke, Zappa, Morse, Metheny, Pastorius, Berlin all have practiced so much and have totally mastered their instruments that it just comes out naturally with no thinking.

Exactly like the Japanese Zen concept of "mushin" ( "no mind").
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Postby drdennis on Fri Nov 04, 2005 2:39 pm

Gilesfan wrote:
drdennis wrote:I fully agree with Mark.
In a Frippian taxonomy "relaxation" is necessary
tension, whereas "tension" is unecessary tension.
I think he and Parker, and other master musicians,
are quite relaxed and free in their playing, but highly
intentional and absorbed in the moment, as a result of
countless hours of paying their tab in learning and
development (e.g. practice!)


I agree totally.

Great improvisors and soloists like Fripp, Parker, Gillespie, Coltrane, Davis, Moraz, Holdsworth, Goodsall, Corea, Burton, McLaughlin, Hancock, Marsalis (both), Hubbard, Brown, Shorter, Rollins, Peterson, Clarke, Zappa, Morse, Metheny, Pastorius, Berlin all have practiced so much and have totally mastered their instruments that it just comes out naturally with no thinking.

Exactly like the Japanese Zen concept of "mushin" ( "no mind").


What a staggering list of masters. I want to print it and head to the
record store. Well, maybe itunes.

I've been thinking lately, perhaps, the greatest obstacle in
crawling towards this sort of playing is just how discouraging
and soul crushing the hours and hours of meticulous work can
be as one practices and develops one's technique. As Fripp, reportedly,
has spent a great deal of time confronting himself in this way,
I think he has many great suggestions to offer in how to cope
with this cognitive interference and simply sit with the instrument.
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Postby MarkSullivan on Fri Nov 04, 2005 8:24 pm

drdennis wrote:I've been thinking lately, perhaps, the greatest obstacle in crawling towards this sort of playing is just how discouraging
and soul crushing the hours and hours of meticulous work can
be as one practices and develops one's technique. As Fripp, reportedly, has spent a great deal of time confronting himself in this way, I think he has many great suggestions to offer in how to cope with this cognitive interference and simply sit with the instrument.


You're right: it can be staggering to consider how far you've got to go as a player. But if you're truly dedicated, and honest with yourself, it's a simple matter of deciding what skills you want to acquire. Then you break them down into gradual, attainable sets, and get to work. I've done this several times in my playing life, when it felt like I'd peaked out. It's difficult, but the results are incredibly rewarding. For every challenge I've taken on--the latest has been to try to become a truly facile sight-reader--I've gotten so much more out of it than I expected. It's an amazing, wonderous thing.
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