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How much would you pay to see Led Zeppelin in concert?

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How much would you pay to see Led Zeppelin in concert?

$1000.00
1
5%
$500.00
0
No votes
$300.00
0
No votes
$200.00
1
5%
$100.00
6
31%
$75.00
2
10%
$50.00
3
15%
$25.00
1
5%
I would only go if given a free ticket!
1
5%
I would not go no matter what!
3
15%
I would stay home and watch the DVD!
1
5%
 
Total votes : 19

zep tour

Postby steven on Mon Feb 18, 2008 8:00 am

I wouldn't cross the street from my house to see LZ, well maybe if there was free Mackeson Stout all night long and I didn't have to pay attention to the band. I WOULD pay big bucks to see the Groundhogs with the "Who Will Save the World" line up.
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Postby FraKcman on Mon Feb 18, 2008 10:09 am

I'm grateful to the Crimson News Feeds on the portal page of this site for directing me to the wonderful article BETTER THAN FREE by Kevin Kelly. It's a fascinating read and somewhat moot given Margie's post above. For those who don't care to read the whole article, here's just the first two paragraphs...
BETTER THAN FREE [2.5.08]
By Kevin Kelly

The internet is a copy machine. At its most foundational level, it copies every action, every character, every thought we make while we ride upon it. In order to send a message from one corner of the internet to another, the protocols of communication demand that the whole message be copied along the way several times. IT companies make a lot of money selling equipment that facilitates this ceaseless copying. Every bit of data ever produced on any computer is copied somewhere. The digital economy is thus run on a river of copies. Unlike the mass-produced reproductions of the machine age, these copies are not just cheap, they are free.

Our digital communication network has been engineered so that copies flow with as little friction as possible. Indeed, copies flow so freely we could think of the internet as a super-distribution system, where once a copy is introduced it will continue to flow through the network forever, much like electricity in a superconductive wire. We see evidence of this in real life. Once anything that can be copied is brought into contact with internet, it will be copied, and those copies never leave. Even a dog knows you can't erase something once its flowed on the internet.
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Postby vrooom on Mon Feb 18, 2008 12:42 pm

Owen wrote:Dude, get some therapy already.


Dude, this is my therapy... :D

Now I'm off to drown some kittens in a sack!


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Postby Margie on Mon Feb 18, 2008 5:46 pm

FraKcman wrote:I'm grateful to the Crimson News Feeds on the portal page of this site for directing me to the wonderful article BETTER THAN FREE by Kevin Kelly. It's a fascinating read and somewhat moot given Margie's post above. For those who don't care to read the whole article, here's just the first two paragraphs...
BETTER THAN FREE [2.5.08]
By Kevin Kelly

The internet is a copy machine.....Even a dog knows you can't erase something once its flowed on the internet.


Exactly.

How many kittens? Just for future reference...
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Postby Yorkshire Square on Mon Feb 18, 2008 8:06 pm

FraKcman wrote:I'm grateful to the Crimson News Feeds on the portal page of this site for directing me to the wonderful article BETTER THAN FREE by Kevin Kelly. It's a fascinating read and somewhat moot given Margie's post above. For those who don't care to read the whole article, here's just the first two paragraphs...
BETTER THAN FREE [2.5.08]
By Kevin Kelly

The internet is a copy machine. At its most foundational level, it copies every action, every character, every thought we make while we ride upon it. In order to send a message from one corner of the internet to another, the protocols of communication demand that the whole message be copied along the way several times. IT companies make a lot of money selling equipment that facilitates this ceaseless copying. Every bit of data ever produced on any computer is copied somewhere. The digital economy is thus run on a river of copies. Unlike the mass-produced reproductions of the machine age, these copies are not just cheap, they are free.

Our digital communication network has been engineered so that copies flow with as little friction as possible. Indeed, copies flow so freely we could think of the internet as a super-distribution system, where once a copy is introduced it will continue to flow through the network forever, much like electricity in a superconductive wire. We see evidence of this in real life. Once anything that can be copied is brought into contact with internet, it will be copied, and those copies never leave. Even a dog knows you can't erase something once its flowed on the internet.


Just sounds like the "canals/railways/motor car/television/compact disc (delete as appropriate) will revolutionise our lives and last forever" arguments. Remember the following points and you won't go far wrong:

1. Nothing is forever.
2. Nothing is free; whilst it may not appear to have a price, there is ultimately a cost in some form to be borne somewhere.

Like any other technology, the internet will fade in importance and be replaced by the latest whatever. The whole internet mechanism seems to be driven by the need to sell advertising (even DGM succumbed to this one) and eventually the large corporations will discover a more effective way of trying to brainwash us and flog us tripe.

Dross like ProjeKction has zero importance in any scale of things. Whilst what I write here might be copied billions of times, it is just a tiny dropping in a small pile of dung in a very large mound of shit; so who would want to rake over it? Meanwhile we all (well most of us) have real lives to get on with...
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Postby vrooom on Mon Feb 18, 2008 9:34 pm

Yorkshire Square wrote:Dross like ProjeKction has zero importance in any scale of things. Whilst what I write here might be copied billions of times, it is just a tiny dropping in a small pile of dung in a very large mound of shit; so who would want to rake over it? Meanwhile we all (well most of us) have real lives to get on with...


I love you, man... :(


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Postby vrooom on Mon Feb 18, 2008 9:42 pm

Margie wrote:How many kittens? Just for future reference...


A whole litter's worth...and then I'll start on the puppies...

I still can't grasp the concept of lots of copies = equals no value idea. I handle hundreds of pounds worth of bank notes and coins everyday, and there are millions of copies of those in circulation, yet they all have value. I don't get it. :?



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Postby TheCrimsonChin on Tue Feb 19, 2008 1:46 pm

Just sounds like the "canals/railways/motor car/television/compact disc (delete as appropriate) will revolutionise our lives and last forever" arguments.


All of these things DID revolutionize our lives and continue to be utilized.

Like any other technology, the internet will fade in importance and be replaced by the latest whatever.


More likely it will evolve into something more integrated with our lives. The lines between Internet, Television, Radio, Wireless Communication, etc are already fading considerably. I don't think it will be long before The Net invades all aspects of our lives.
If I had something important to say, why would I put it all the way down here?
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Postby Yorkshire Square on Tue Feb 19, 2008 2:52 pm

TheCrimsonChin wrote:
Just sounds like the "canals/railways/motor car/television/compact disc (delete as appropriate) will revolutionise our lives and last forever" arguments.


All of these things DID revolutionize our lives and continue to be utilized.


Of course they were important in their time, your word "DID"; that is my point.

How much commercial canal traffic is there now? None? Infinitessimally small amount? Rail traffic? Reducing overall with exceptions? When did you last catch a train? How often do you use the train? How much of your purchases is shipped by rail? What is the prevailing attitude to the internal combustion engine? Loathing? Unwelcome necessity? How many governments are disincentivising car travel? etc. etc. etc...

Believe me, this technology (the internet) will go the way of all technologies. Ultimately. And then we will lose the ability to access and understand that technology. For example, can you make a flint arrowhead? How many people understand how the great pyramids were constructed? None? A handful? Have you tried getting a mainline steam locomotive manufactured? The information is there, but there are precious few people with the werewithall to understand/implement it. Can you play those wax cylinder recordings you have (hell, I can't even play the vinyl LPs I own anymore)?

But on the whole we don't need those technologies any more. Society will change, as it always does, and the importance of this technology will diminish too...
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Postby TheCrimsonChin on Tue Feb 19, 2008 4:42 pm

Yorkshire Square wrote:Of course they were important in their time, your word "DID"; that is my point.


In your post you gave me the impress that you dismiss these developments as no longer having relevance.

How much commercial canal traffic is there now? None? Infinitessimally small amount?

Wrong. There is enough traffic through the Panama Canal that is being expanded. link here

Rail traffic? Reducing overall with exceptions? When did you last catch a train? How often do you use the train? How much of your purchases is shipped by rail?

Rail traffic in the US continues to be the primary means for shipping things like coal, cattle, etc.. Shipping by rail is a much more efficient method than by truck. I wish I could take the commuter train to my job, but the logistics don't work for me.

What is the prevailing attitude to the internal combustion engine? Loathing? Unwelcome necessity? How many governments are disincentivising car travel? etc. etc. etc...

Believe me, this technology (the internet) will go the way of all technologies. Ultimately. And then we will lose the ability to access and understand that technology. For example, can you make a flint arrowhead? How many people understand how the great pyramids were constructed? None? A handful? Have you tried getting a mainline steam locomotive manufactured? The information is there, but there are precious few people with the werewithall to understand/implement it. Can you play those wax cylinder recordings you have (hell, I can't even play the vinyl LPs I own anymore)?

But on the whole we don't need those technologies any more. Society will change, as it always does, and the importance of this technology will diminish too...


Sorry, I don't believe you. ;-)

Of course this technology will eventually become obsolete in its present form but not because it will cease to exist but because it will evolve. Your example of a steam locomotive is a good one. Trains didn't go away, they evolved. The internet won't go away either.
If I had something important to say, why would I put it all the way down here?
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